Tag Archives: Medicine

Guest blogger: RETIREMENT/30/65/GRAD

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Editor (Sara)’s note: For the first time in saratreetravels history, we are proud to welcome a guest blogger to our travel universe – my (tied-for-) favourite travel partner and mother, Mary!!

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What a year!

Sara and I talked about doing a major trip, but her idea and mine of a major trip were two different things. When she asked me where I would like to go, I stretched it to my biggest dreams I could imagine of what I could do in my lifetime. I suggested wild things like a train trip across Canada, or sitting on the beach in Hawaii (which by the way was slowly being covered by lava). I stretched even farther to the Alaskan cruise up the West side of our fair country.

Imagine my amazement when I received the email from Sara who must have chuckled at my ‘amazing dreams’. My dreams were so small. She sent me an agenda that saw us flying to Rome. “Now” she said “what would you like to see now?”

Editor’s note: Small?! Absolutely not how I would describe my mom’s dreams… her life has been my inspiration to dream big!

Now my vision was set farther. Europe was never in my thoughts for a trip I could ever do in my lifetime. Now I had the ticket, just had to come up with an agenda. Sara asked me, “NOW what do you want to see?” I threw out things that I had dreamed of, again, never expecting to see them happen: The Coliseum, the Vatican, Pompeii, Venice, maybe a side trip to Ukraine to see dad’s family again.

Sara took my ideas under advisement, and came up with an agenda of almost three weeks. I got my boat cruise (not the Alaskan Cruise, but on the Danube which I had planned with a friend who had passed away before we could see it). I got my train trip (two actually), I walked the Coliseum (oh yes, it was at the end of our street in view of our hostel) and the Vatican. I walked Pompeii and marvelled at the amazing lost city. I took a gondola on the canals of Venice and visited the lace museum in Burano. We experienced the amazing city of Vienna and the Matyas heritage in Budapest including public baths and the Matyas church and castle.

Wait, what’s that we spy from our front door? Could it be… ??!!

Exploring the ancient mysteries of Pompei

Aboard a gondola for a canal-eye view of Venezia

El Museo del Merletto (The Burano Lace School & Museum)

Stadtpark Vienna City Park

Beautiful Budapest

As a grand finale, we took a train to Lviv, Ukraine and then drove to Lanchyn where I was able to once again see my dad’s village, walk the roads that he walked, sit for dinner with his family.



What an adventure! I am so grateful to have had this chance to see all I did. Kudos to Sara who planned all this in spite of writing exams and doing those things required to complete her MD. Challenge should have been her middle name because she most certainly meets the challenge. However her middle name is even better: Hope. Without the Hope, we don’t have energy for future plans. And so I say “Thanks for the memories.” It was an awesome experience of a lifetime!

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Caring For & About

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Rewind one month ago to my final week of Med 3, a week that naturally included me hosting a family party, two band practices, a live radio interview, a final call shift, an NBME, an out-of-town house guest, and an album release.

Celebrating Annie’s 60th, with love

Heathen Eve’s radio debut on UMFM’s “Made You A Mixtape”! http://www.umfm.com/programming/shows/episode/43586/

Album Release!! “Reconcilable Differences” now available on Spotify, iTunes, Google Play, Bandcamp, and local music stores near you 😀 https://heatheneve.bandcamp.com/releases


12 hours after our show ended, I hastily shoved some clinic clothes and my stethoscope into a backpack and climbed onto a plane to Sudbury for my first Med 4 elective – a three-week placement in Addictions Medicine. My weeks were spent in a vast variety of community services aimed at helping patients recognize and manage their substance use disorders (SUD). One of the clinics I worked in specialized in “opioid replacement therapy,” which some people may recognize by names like “methadone,” “MMT,” or “Suboxone.” This is a treatment option for people with opiate use disorders (morphine, hydromorphone, Percs, Oxy, etc.) that provides a carefully-prescribed amount of medication (either Methadone or Buprenorphine/Naloxone) that acts in a similar way to opioids in people’s systems, helping them to safely reduce the amount of opioids they need to take and avoid crippling withdrawal symptoms and/or overdose. Harm reduction houses are another valuable service in the Addictions field, where individuals at risk for or experiencing homelessness are offered assistance in securing housing, while also addressing alcohol use disorder through harm reduction strategies such as monitored alcohol administration. Residential treatment programs are a major component of Addictions, ranging from abstinence-based programs (where clients cannot use any substances for a period of time before entering treatment) to harm-reduction programs (where clients are able to be actively using substances while seeking treatment, and efforts are made to minimize the risks associated with using), to anywhere on the spectrum between the two.

Residential treatment programs such as Benbowopka aim to address SUD by helping clients re-establish balance in their mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health

In particular, I spent several days working with Monarch Recovery Services, an “Addiction Centre of Excellence” that offers treatment programs spanning individuals who are managing active withdrawal, who are acknowledging their SUD for the very first time, who have been living in a recovery home for a year, who have started work again and require some help with housing, who have an SUD and discover they are pregnant, who have five kiddos and are struggling with an SUD, who have been abstinent for 10 years and continue to come to Aftercare for support with their SUD.

Getting familiar with Sudbury’s core downtown areas

I know for some this is a hard topic to read about, hear about, or even think about. I know addictions and substance use have not, historically, been topics that have been treated with the greatest grace. But the fact of the matter is that addiction is a chronic health condition. The Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) defines addiction as “a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory, and related circuitry. Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations.” But with that definition comes hope: As a recognized medical entity, addiction is now recognized as “a preventable and treatable disease, helping to shed the stigma of misunderstanding that has long plagued it.” In other words, addicts are not necessarily “bad” or scary people. They are people with a serious health condition that, like any health condition, requires a balance of external support and personal action in order to prevent (ideally!), recognize, and manage it. More often than not, addiction co-occurs with trauma, since “addictive behaviours [are] a way of coping with emotional pain, a way of self-soothing that is not appropriate.”

An individual I spoke with eloquently summarized all of the above: “I know I have an addiction. But the question is – why do I have it?” A crucial component of recovery from an SUD is learning healthy life skills and effective coping mechanisms to replace the destructive dependance on substances as a means to attempt to handle challenges. But, as stated by Dr. David Marsh, a NOSM Addictions Specialist, “A drug user is never going to come to treatment if they die of an overdose.” In other words, while modalities like wet shelters or opioid replacement therapy do not address the underlying why? of an addiction, evidence shows without a doubt that they reduce the number of overdose deaths (see page 21), thus allowing patients the chance to stabilize to a point where they can enter further treatment to address the root causes of their addiction.

As someone who is both a professional in the medical looking to help clients with addictions, as well as an individual who is personally affected by people with addictions, this has been a difficult topic to approach. It has been challenging to recognize that I feel able to offer a very different type of support to clients who are struggling with addictions compared to those I know personally who are struggling. Does this make me a hypocrite? Am I callous towards those I claim to love?

But I have come to recognize that “caring about” and “caring for” are two very different things, and are fulfilled by different people occupying very different roles in the client’s life. Unconditional love is the role of a family member or friend. It proclaims, “I see you as a human being worthy of love, and I care ABOUT you.” But unconditionally loving someone does not mean you can or should care FOR them.

Caring for someone’s withdrawal symptoms, assessing the need for counselling through past trauma, helping them recognize and address a dearth of essential life skills – these are needed roles for professionals such as physicians, social workers, therapists. Caring for someone with a SUD requires a certain level of neutrality and distance. As the healthcare professional, I am not living with the individual struggling with an SUD or affected personally by their finances/relationships/housing/behaviours. Therefore, I am able to advocate for that individual 100% without compromising my own health or safety – as is often the case with family members or partners involved.

In the last several decades, we have made amazing advances in our understanding of and ability to manage chronic diseases like diabetes and arthritis. Let us open the door to understanding the world of addictions in order to start breaking down barriers to effective care.

Taking time for personal wellness with Thanksgiving swims at favourite park #1

Golden afternoon walks through favourite park #2



Adios for now, Sudbury. Next stop, Toronto!

News from away! (with the Batmanns and their iPad)

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We received our iPad just before going to Argentina, and it has been our faithful travel companion ever since. It was on this little screen that we saw our niece for the first time (after hiking six hours down a mountain to find wifi on a semi-weekly basis… Two weeks overdue, seriously, kiddo?!);
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that Josh applied for Education from an Argentine campground (and was accepted!);
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that a Mennonite frantically tried to learn Cree as his train chugged towards the Northern school at which he was expected to teach it;
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and of course, it was on this little screen that this very blog was born.
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Now, halfway across the world in a different direction, our little iPad has remained faithful in keeping us connected with our lives back home and in being the bearer of some very exciting news. In May, in a campground outside of Rome, it was on this iPad that I opened the email that would change the direction of my life yet again:
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Med!

Going into Medicine has been a dream of mine for many years. I am beyond thrilled to not only have the chance to study Medicine, but also to study it in the Bilingual Stream, which will allow me to continue pursuing my passion for the French language and the French community that has become an incredible part of my life!

I received the email around midnight, so all the buses going into town had stopped running. Therefore, we celebrated my future career in Medicine by running across the highway and going to McDonald’s for celebratory McNuggets. I figured I didn’t need to worry about being a good role model for healthy eating practices until I was actually IN med school 😉
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After receiving my acceptance in May, I had a few blissful weeks free of any obligations. Finally, however, the magnitude of paperwork caught up to me. In early July, I spent an entire day in my cousin’s office in a tiny hamlet of Switzerland downloading, printing, filling out, scanning, and finally coaxing an ancient fax machine to send all the forms required for my admission. I am frankly astounded that the forms actually sent properly… I don’t know if the College of Physicians & Surgeons of Manitoba have ever received an enrollment package from Ober-Says, Switzerland!
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Faxing

During this trip, Josh’s path has also meandered along some new adventures! In May, Mr. B officially graduated with his B.Ed. Although we were in Köln, Germany at the time of his convocation, his wonderful Ed friends made sure to include him in their celebrations:
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Grad

In June, we were living in a London flat with Josh’s family during their annual trek to England. One Sunday evening, Josh received an email describing a possible job opportunity for the fall. He excitedly emailed back, but the next day, we went to Glastonbury for the night, so we were without Internet for one day. ONE DAY… which was apparently enough time for the principal of the school to request an interview with Josh! Arriving home that night to a pile of emails, we panicked that he had missed his chance. However, thanks to a convenient time difference and some speedy Skype-calls, Josh got ahold of the school, who reassured him that it wasn’t too late, his interview could be moved to the next day.

Fantastic… Except that the next day, we had tickets to see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory at London’s West End. So, we brought the iPad and during the show, Josh snuck out of the theatre and ended up doing his interview in the theatre bar over Skype. Only at one point did his potential employer ask Josh if there was a marching band in the background. Unconventional, perhaps – but, that very evening, there was a job offer in his inbox, so unconventional seemed to have worked!!
Josh Skype

A huge thank-you to Laura for faithfully checking our mail back at home, M.O.M. for being willing to sign and drop off all Sara’s crazy forms, Andreas and Simone for letting Sara commandeer their office all day and then (trying to) explain to their workplace why two Canadians had to use the fax machine for an hour, Gwen and Leanne U. for being the most persistent emailers, the Dixons for the 3G, the bartender at Royal Drury Lane Theatre for not batting an eyelash during Josh’s interview, Margaret Park School for being so flexible (note from Josh: I’m so excited to join you this fall!)… And to all of our amazing friends and family, back in Winnipeg or here in Europe, who cheer us on in our crazy, unconventional, ridiculous adventures. We love you guys and love sharing our life with you!

Js Glastonbury